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DOPENESS INTERACTIVE / Rihanna Covers Vanity Fair’s November Issue and Gets Real About Chris Brown: “I Was Very Protective of Him” / 0%

Rihanna Covers Vanity Fair’s November Issue and Gets Real About Chris Brown: “I Was Very Protective of Him”

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Rihanna has been in the general public’s eye since to 2005, however while a great many people think they know everything there is to know about the singer, Rihanna concedes that her notoriety and the truth of her life are two altogether different things. In addition to being a sex icon, partying it up, and releases over-the-top music videos, the 27-year-old is quite ordinary. In the November issue of Vanity Fair, Rihanna gets genuine about everything from her rough romance with Chris Brown to her feelings on casual sex to the Rachel Dolezal scandal. Read some of her best quotes from the feature below:
On thinking she could change Chris Brown:

“A hundred percent. I was very protective of him. I felt that people didn’t understand him. Even after . . . But you know, you realize after a while that in that situation you’re the enemy. You want the best for them, but if you remind them of their failures, or if you remind them of bad moments in their life, or even if you say I’m willing to put up with something, they think less of you — because they know you don’t deserve what they’re going to give. And if you put up with it, maybe you are agreeing that you [deserve] this, and that’s when I finally had to say, ‘Uh-oh, I was stupid thinking I was built for this.’ Sometimes you just have to walk away. I don’t hate him. I will care about him until the day I die. We’re not friends, but it’s not like we’re enemies. We don’t have much of a relationship now.”

On domestic abuse:

“Well, I just never understood that, like how the victim gets punished over and over. It’s in the past, and I don’t want to say ‘Get over it,’ because it’s a very serious thing that is still relevant; it’s still real. A lot of women, a lot of young girls, are still going through it. A lot of young boys, too. It’s not a subject to sweep under the rug, so I can’t just dismiss it like it wasn’t anything, or I don’t take it seriously. But, for me, and anyone who’s been a victim of domestic abuse, nobody wants to even remember it. Nobody even wants to admit it. So to talk about it and say it once, much less 200 times, is like . . . I have to be punished for it? It didn’t sit well with me.”

On why she doesn’t sleep around:

“If I wanted to I would completely do that. I am going to do what makes me feel happy, what I feel like doing. But that would be empty for me; that to me is a hollow move. I would wake up the next day feeling like shit.”

On how fame has made her lonely:

“I mean I get horny, I’m human, I’m a woman, I want to have sex. But what am I going to do — just find the first random cute dude that I think is going to be a great ride for the night and then tomorrow I wake up feeling empty and hollow? He has a great story and I’m like . . . what am I doing? I can’t do it to myself. I cannot. It has a little bit to do with fame and a lot to do with the woman that I am. And that saves me. It is lonely, but I have so much work to do that I get distracted. I don’t have time to be lonely.”

On why men today are afraid to be men:

“I always see the best in people. I hope for the best, and I always look for that little bit of good, that potential, and I wait for it to blossom. You want them to feel good being a man, but now men are afraid to be men. They think being a real man is actually being a p*ssy, that if you take a chair out for a lady, or you’re nice or even affectionate to your girl in front of your boys, you’re less of a man. It’s so sick. They won’t be a gentleman because that makes them appear soft. That’s what we’re dealing with now, a hundred percent, and girls are settling for that, but I won’t. I will wait forever if I have to . . . but that’s OK. You have to be screwed over enough times to know, but now I’m hoping for more than these guys can actually give.”

On Rachel Dolezal:

“I think she was a bit of a hero, because she kind of flipped on society a little bit. Is it such a horrible thing that she pretended to be black? Black is a great thing, and I think she legit changed people’s perspective a bit and woke people up.”

Via: Popsugar | Photo credit : Vanity Fair

The Use of this Article, displayed on our website is for Educational use only. We (Dopeness Magazine) do not take any credit in both creating the media and information of this article; All credit goes to their rightful owners and business entities.

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