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DOPENESS INTERACTIVE / Jazmine Sullivan : Reality Show (Album Review) / 0%

Jazmine Sullivan : Reality Show (Album Review)

Written by 2 minutes, 42 seconds Read

ARTIST

Jazmine Sullivan

ALBUM NAME

Reality Show

LABEL

RCA

DOPENESS RATING

8

ARTIST

Jazmine Sullivan

ALBUM NAME

Reality Show

LABEL

RCA

DOPENESS RATING

8

Imagine underrated. Imagine talent beyond limits, a voice meant to shape the world. Now open your eyes and ears and look and see Jazmine Sullivan, her strong, raw voice, one heard and unnoticed, underplayed. That all changes with the release of her third album, “Reality Show,” a musical satire which laughs at and embraces today’s culture and has personally blown the lid off the images of music and television in this generation. Sully steps it up in her third release, in control of the woman she is and schooling the young girls in life in the boldest move of her career.


The second track, “Mascara,” explores the mentality of the female mind in a “Love and Hip Hop/Real Housewives” generation. Enjoyable solely on the lyrics, Sully explains the mindset of the woman who lives on her beauty and not much else. A sad girl power tune, she explains tribulations a today’s reality stars and ‘regular’ women face: jealous girls, men as horny infidels, the importance of beauty as means of security. The song opens up with the most powerful line, my hair and my a** fake…I get my rent paid.” Sully meticulously penetrates the mind while laughing at the women who play into letting their beauty control their status.


The number five, “#HoodLove,” further intensifies the theme of the album. With a tantric, urban tempo, Sullivan places her man on a pedestal and centers herself as the “ride or die” who will follow her provider to the ends of the earth, for all the wrong reasons. She proclaims her love and loyalty with gritty street lyrics that reminds you of the days when Mary J. Blige and Lil’ Kim reigned the charts. The song will hit home for those who participate in “The Struggle,” very real, very enjoyable.

The following track, the number six, “Let it Burn,” is a classic. With a mid-80’s tempo and early-90’s lyrics, the track sounds like a Stephanie Mills/Faith Evans mashup. Cleverly infused with soul and urban pop influence, Sully invites you to a world of submission and admission of love. The hook, “you feel that fire, just let it burn” gets you amped and soulful as she captures the rapturous moment of realizing your lover. Sully uses her signature raspy octaves to send the message clear: let love reign. It sounds like Anita Baker’s “Caught Up in the Rapture” meets Mary J Blige’s “I’m Goin’ Down,” very soulful and groovy.

The less sassy but just as powerful tracks on the album serve as equilibrium for this bold record. Songs such as the number 12 “Masterpiece” and the pop infused number 13 “If You Dare” mellow out and interpret the realization of womanhood and sexual desire, respectively. They reel you in from the street high but grind against the dark, city feel. From the lyrics to her sultry, intoxicating contralto voice, Jazmine Sullivan clearly makes her presence known-on her own terms.

All in all, the album is a 12-track gem, sure to further intensify Sullivan’s career and cement her presence as a powerful artist, a woman in control of her voice. She has fun, she taunts and flaunts on this album, her most creative to date. The album was released almost secretly, on January 13. 

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